Awards and honours

Nani Jansen Reventlow speaks at the 2018 Oxford Internet Institute Awards where she received an Internet and Society Award for her work on digital rights legislation. Photo: OII
Nani Jansen Reventlow speaks at the 2018 Oxford Internet Institute Awards where she received an Internet and Society Award for her work on digital rights. Photo: OII

Nani has received a number of awards and honours in recognition of her work, including: 

In 2021, Nani received the Stefan A. Riesenfeld Memorial Award, which honours one distinguished scholar or practitioner every year for their outstanding contribution to the field of international law. Organisers cited Nani’s accomplishments in litigating freedom of expression cases in international and national tribunals, as well as her digital rights leadership and advocacy as reasons for their unanimous decision to honour her with the accolade. 

In 2020, Nani was one of the honourees featured in the Annual Harvard Law International Women’s Day Portrait Exhibit of “Women Inspiring Change“. Organisers said Nani leads with integrity, determination, and creativity and “is not afraid to speak truth to power and to call out foundations of racism, sexism, and imperialism at the base of today’s human rights injustices.” 

In 2018, Nani received the Oxford Internet Institute Internet & Society Award, recognising extraordinary contributions towards the development, use or study of the Internet for the public good, for having founded the Digital Freedom Fund.  

In 2015, Nani was shortlisted for the Law Society’s Excellence Award for Human Rights Lawyer of the Year, in recognition of her international litigation work in defence of media freedom.  

In 2015, the Media Legal Defence Initiative, of which Nani was then Legal Director, received the inaugural Columbia University Global Freedom of Expression Prize for Excellence in Legal Services for its work on the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights’ first free speech case. The jury found that Nani’s arguments “persuaded the Court to deliver a groundbreaking judgment” which represented “a high‐water mark for freedom of expression in Africa.”